Russell's Blog

New. Improved. Stays crunchy in milk.

Uzon, Day Six

Posted by Russell on August 20, 2010 at 4:44 p.m.
This post is for August 11th, 2010

Russia is working hard to reign in the chaos that followed the end of the Soviet Union, and Kronotsky National Biosphere Park is no exception. Restrictions on hunting and fishing that were once widely ignored or impossible to implement are now being enforced. The rules are not exactly settled, but it is clear that the park administration is serious about protecting the wild state of the preserve. This is a Very Good Thing.

In 2005, Frank joined an expedition to Uzon led by Juergen Wiegel; this was before the research station was built, and so they flew in several large tents packed in crates. The crates could be unfolded to form a platform for the tents. When they broke camp, they left the crates behind. If the park administration is going to be serious about protecting the natural state of the caldera, Frank and Albert thought it would be a good idea to do our part too. So, we spent the morning breaking down the crates at the 2004 camp. We then hauled the disassembled crates to the research station (new since 2004), and arranged them in neat stacks. The rangers will find some use for the wood now that in easy reach, I'm sure.

When we arrived, the crates from the old camp were piled up in the middle of the camp. I'm not sure exactly how long the crates were splayed over the ground at the old site (they were designed to form a platform for the tents) before they were piled up there, but I find it interesting that the footprint of the old camp is still clearly visible. The plants are still in the process of recolonizing the space. There can be no more explicit evidence that Uzon's ecology is indeed fragile. The lush meadows I wrote about yesterday would probably take decades or centuries to form if they had to start over from scratch. I'm sorry I don't have any pictures; one cannot be both a good photographer and diligent manual labor at the same time.


Alex thinks he has pulled a fast one on me. Anna is not amused by any of this. Not even Frank's hat.

After lunch, Frank and I set out together to collect some samples from Burlyaschy and K4 Well.


Collecting a sample from Burlyaschy (Boiling Spring). It's about 90C where my feet are, and it's deeper than my ankles. It's a good thing I'm wearing thigh waders and three pairs of socks!

While Frank was working on his own samples, I waded a few meters into Burlyaschy Spring to fill a liter bottle with water. The water is about 90C there, and boiling vigorously only three or four meters beyond. I was wearing three layers of insulated gloves, and three pairs of socks under my waders, but the heat was almost unbearable. You really don't want to fall down in this thing!


Filtering a liter of water from Burlyaschy with a Sterivex filter and a 60ml syringe. The bottle was almost too hot to handle, even with insulated gloves. If there's anything alive in the planktonic community, it's definitely a hyperthermophile!

After (carefully) returning to what passes for dry land in the thermal field, I decanted the liter bottle into a 60ml syringe with a LuerLok fitting, and attached a Sterivex-HV 0.45 micron filter. I then forced the water through the filter, which started to block up after about 600ml. The last 300ml went through really, really slowly and with a lot of sweat and cursing. It took a 20 repetitions to finish off the bottle.


Decanting spring water collected from K4 Well into a 60ml syringe, to be forced through a Sterivex filter.

After that, we walked over to K4 Well to collect Frank's slides. Frank is planning to use them for electron microscopy, so he had to fix them before storing them, which took a long time. This gave me time to process two liters of water and steam spewing from the rupture on the K4 wellhead and shove them through two more Sterivex filters.

We walked back to the station, and I fixed my filters in ethanol and D-PBS buffer.

This was to be our last full day in Uzon, so I packed most of my things before going to bed. Albert and Sarah stayed up all night finishing the DNA extractions.

Ignore this field:
 optional; will not be displayed
Don't put anything in this field:
 optional
Don't put anything here:
Leave this empty:
URLs auto-link and some tags are allowed: <a><b><i><p>.