My papers, for Aaron Swartz

This past Friday, I was enjoying a dinner party with some friends in Brooklyn. Elsewhere in Brooklyn, Aaron Swartz, a fellow I have long admired, hanged himself after two years of being stalked, bullied and harassed by those we employ to Serve and Protect. He was being prosecuted for downloading a bunch of academic papers. Papers to which he had legal access, and whose content was overwhelmingly funded by taxpayers. His “crime” was that he downloaded a lot of them, although the publisher imposed no particular limit on how many he could download, and that he downloaded them from a network he perhaps didn’t have permission to use. The “victims,” JSTOR, the publisher, and MIT, the owner of the network, were not the least interested in pursuing either a civil or criminal case against Aaron.

Perversely, the Department of Justice and the Secret Service thought otherwise. The US Attorney’s Office was about to go to trial with charges that would have resulted in thirty years of imprisonment were Aaron convicted, but I can’t imagine that Aaron hanged himself because he was afraid.

Aaron was a patriot and a humanitarian. He was dedicated to the work of delivering a dose of integrity to the institutions of democracy, even as those very institutions crushed him for… for what, exactly? Sport and amusement, it seems. The People’s case against Aaron Swartz, as represented by US attorney Carmen Ortiz, only makes sense if the People are sadistic bullies. It’s hard not to wonder if Carmen Ortiz was planning to run for elected office, and if so, it’s impossible to see Ortiz’ case against Aaron as anything other than a cold-blooded gambit for future campaign donations from the media and publishing industries. Aaron’s destruction was to be a signal that Carmen Ortiz is tough on piracy. Grist for the mill of our perfectly-legal political corruption.

That’s not paranoia. That’s politics in America. Aaron was deeply committed to healing the necrotic tissues of America’s democracy. Over the last two years, reading about the case against him absolutely boiled my blood, but it must have broken Aaron’s heart. Perhaps he despaired that America can be saved from the rot, or could no longer withstand the pain and humiliation of being so ill-treated by the republic he cared so much about.

As my tribute to Aaron, I’ve downloaded all of my own papers and posted them here. Since joining Jonathan Eisen’s lab, I’ve been publishing in Open Access journals, and so the two most recent papers are perfectly legal for me to post here. The first three were written before I worked for an advisor who understood what is really at stake in scientific publishing, and so they are not open access. Here they are anyway. For Aaron.

  1. Functional biogeography of ocean microbes revealed through Non-Negative matrix factorization.
    Xingpeng Jiang, Morgan G. I. Langille, Russell Y. Neches, Marie Elliot, Simon A. Levin, Jonathan A. Eisen, Joshua S. Weitz, and Jonathan Dushoff. PLoS ONE, 7(9):e43866+, September 2012.
    doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0043866
  2. A workflow for genome-wide mapping of archaeal transcription factors with ChIP-seq.
    Elizabeth G. Wilbanks, David J. Larsen, Russell Y. Neches, Andrew I. Yao, Chia-Ying Wu, Rachel A. S. Kjolby, and Marc T. Facciotti. Nucleic Acids Research, February 2012.
    doi:10.1093/nar/gks063
  3. The convergence of analytic high- equilibrium in a finite aspect ratio tokamak.
    R. Y. Neches, S. C. Cowley, P. A. Gourdain, and J. N. Leboeuf. Physics of Plasmas, 15(12):122504+, 2008.
    doi:10.1063/1.3008049
  4. Stability of highly shifted equilibria in a large aspect ratio low-field tokamak.
    P. A. Gourdain, J. N. Leboeuf, and R. Y. Neches. Physics of Plasmas, 14(11):112513+, 2007.
    doi:10.1063/1.2807024
  5. Stability of highly shifted equilibria in a Large-Aspect-ratio tokamak.
    P. A. Gourdain, S. C. Cowley, J. N. Leboeuf, and R. Y. Neches. Physical Review Letters, 97(5), August 2006.
    doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.055003

Posted by Russell Neches

on 14/01/2013 at 07:49 under a Creative Commons Attributuion License.