LA Natural History Museum doesn't grok citations

Earlier today, I received a request to use one of the photographs I’ve posted on Flickr. I get a lot of these requests, and I always find them a bit annoying; I release all of my photographs (and writing, including this blog) under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

I would be delighted if people emailed to say, “Hey, thanks for letting me use your photo! Here’s a link to what the thing I’m using it for.” Even that isn’t strictly necessary, since I always notice the inbound referrals from the attribution links. The whole point is that you don’t need to ask permission because you already have it, provided you give proper attribution. So, as usual, I tried to explain this concept, and got an interesting answer.

Hi Russell,

Thanks for your email. That’s neat to hear that you have a connection to the Museum.

Yes, I did notice that your photo was offered under a Creative Commons license. In the case of this particular video, however, we are crediting contributors by name only (ie “Credit: Russell Neches”. That is one of the reasons why I contacted you directly, to see if you would be willing to waive the standard CC attribution requirements.

If it is ok to only credit using your name, please let me know. Your credit will appear on the image itself. We are also looking to label each photo with the location where the image was taken. Based on the tag, I assume the Opossum image is from Pasadena. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Look forward to hearing from you.

Thanks again,

Sam Easterson

Sam Easterson Senior Media Producer, Nature Lab
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles
900 Exposition Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90007

Wait, he wants me to waive the CC-BY license just so they can avoid actually linking to the original photo in the credit? That doesn’t make a bit of sense. Yes, I want credit for my work, but that’s not why I licence under CC-BY. Even if something is in the public domain, nobody has the right to plagiarize from it, and an author can and should expect their public domain works to be properly credited. You can copy it, and you can cut it into bits, rearrange the bits, paint the whole mess orange and trade for a silly hat. However, you cannot claim you created the original, because, well, you didn’t. That would be fraud.

The reason I use CC-BY instead of Public Domain is because it requires anyone using my work to provide useful attribution information. This is basically the same standard of attribution used in science. Scientists have to cite the work of others in such a way that the reader can actually identify and obtain the cited material for themselves. It’s about access, not just credit.

So, I try to explain…

Ah, I see. Well, I suppose I should explain myself then.

The reason I release my photos under CC-BY rather than Public Domain is because I believe it is important that the practice of traceable attribution be extended to new circumstances. It is important because it is often very important that people be able to ascertain where a particular piece of media came from. For example, they may wish to find related materials, or they may wish to independently verify its authenticity. This is why standard citation formats in research papers are so important. Giving credit is necessary, but not sufficient. The reader must able to actually access the source material, or they aren’t really in a position to exercise judgment.

Now, I understand that this can be awkward when you’re outside the traditional media formats where there is an acknowledged code of conduct for citations. There isn’t yet a “standard” way to include citations in a slideshow, or in a dance performance, or in an opera, or in a sculpture. It’s easy to imagine how doing it badly could mar the work.

Nevertheless, I think it needs to be attempted. The Natural History Museum is the sort of institution that is most likely to actually get it right and to set trends that others will follow. Everything in the museum has to meet pedagogical, scientific and aesthetic goals. It’s one of the things that makes science museums so awesome.

I think developing some best practices for incorporating traceable citations into a mixed media installation is perfectly in keeping with that. After all, you’re not using these images to sell toothpaste. You’re using them to teach the public about science and nature. One of the most important practices in science is making sure the audience has direct access to the sources. Science regards the audience as peers, not as consumers.

Now, I’m not designing the exhibit, so I’m not going to insist on any particular design solution for providing links. I’m sure you can think of something that will work wonderfully, and won’t be much trouble.

I can also imagine how an exuberant use of citations could make the exhibit like what you’re describing extremely awesome. For example, a smartly-designed footer on each image with a scientific name, common name, time, location and a QR code link. Patrons could say, “Ooo! What’s that?” and snap a photo with their phones, and be taken to a page with lots and lots of details about the organism and the source image. That’s not necessarily what you should do, but perhaps you see what I mean about why citations are important? They make media more awesome!

As for the furry fellow in the picture, I found these guys in Eaton Canyon after their mother had been killed by a coyote. The ranger gave the babies to me, I suppose, because she didn’t want them to be eaten by hawks in front of a school group on the hiking trail. They stayed at my mom’s house in Pasadena for a few weeks until they were big enough to eat and do opossum-y things, and then I released them back into Eaton Canyon. The photo was taken in her backyard.

Russell

I was hopeful that this would click. There tons of easy things they could do to house the links. They could make a page on their website somewhere that said “attributions page for exhibit X” with a list of photos and attribution links. It would just take a few minutes, and it would be useful.

But alas, no.

Thanks for your email Russell. I very much appreciate your thoughts.

Unfortunately, in this case, I’m not going to be able to accommodate your request.

I’m sorry that I won’t be able to include your image in the slideshow after all. My apologies for taking up your time.

Sincerely,

Sam

Think about this here. He says, “I’m not going to be able to accommodate your request.” Remember who’s requesting what here. He really means, “I’m not going to be able to comply with the terms of your license.

So, I’m pretty disappointed. I don’t care if they use my photo or not. I get thousands of views already. My photos get used for lots of things, including a couple of elementary school science textbooks in developing countries. The publishers didn’t have any problem putting a link next to my name.

No, I’m disappointed that the Los Angeles Natural History Museum doesn’t seem to understand why citations are important.


Posted by Russell Neches

on 18/03/2013 at 08:25 under a Creative Commons Attributuion License.